Tag Archive for Richard Bandler

Presupposition #3: People are always doing the best they can

Human beings work perfectly to produce the results they are getting. No one is broken. You are perfect and whole just as you are. There is nothing wrong with you… but that also means there is nothing wrong with anyone else, too. 

People are always making the best choice(s) available to them. Given our awareness of our choices, we are all doing the best we know how to do at every moment in time.  We make the best choice available given our unique resources, environment, conditioning, history, and other functions. Within it, we learned what to do and how to do it, what and how to want it, what to value and how to value it, what to learn and how to learn it. This is our experience. From our experience, we make all of our choices. When we have better choices available, to us, we use them.

The conditions we learned to survive (as infants and toddlers) becomes the experience upon which our continued survival depends. Which means, what we learned become a pattern of what we deem as safe. Our brains are always checking, are we safe? Are we safe? If not, it sets off alarm bells. The only problem is the alarm bells are usually bad feelings, disappointments, sadness, hurt feelings, etc. Our brains are checking if the current environment is safe against what it knows (ie: our current map of reality.).

Disappointment requires planning.

-Richard Bandler

So then, healing, growth and success are not a question of getting rid of or eliminating behaviors. Healing, growth and success are a matter of acquiring more behavioral choices. These behavioral choices provide more options for useful responses in all areas of our lives. 

One of the things I tell my clients is that not only that they are doing the best that they can that they know how but, so did their parents and the other people that took care of them at that young age. Those people that created that young experience, we now have embedded as our internal warning and safety system. We can allow that warning system to relax by offering an alternative such as a positive intention. Like: Your parents did the best they could, with the skills they had and that they knew how. By allowing your system a choice, we get to expand your behavioral flexibility and ultimately your experience of life.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Presuppositions of NLP

The thing about presuppositions is that they are not necessarily true. They are observations that Richard Bandler and John Grinder observed as the beliefs that were held by Virginia Sitir, Milton Erickson and Fritz Perls when they were achieving excellence in change with their clients.

We can use these when dealing with others and create great changes in ours and others experience by holding even one of these. However in NLP, if you want to have the best results, you want to hold all of them. I have many, so stay tuned and I will try to explain them all in detail and give some examples.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

 

What is NLP? Definition #9

NLP is… the language of the heart and mind.

If you just apply three quick and simple NLP concepts, you will know how to use NLP to bring more positive and successful behaviors into your life.

1.) Make what you want in life into a positive statement. Most people I work with find it easier to start in the negative – so what don’t you want? or what’s not working as well as you would like? Take those items and switch them into what you consider your opposite. Most people associate the words “good” and “bad” as opposites… but I’ve had “bad” paired with “smart,” “loving,” etc. Use you’re opposites. Don’t worry about what others think… If you do, then you will miss out on the power of this exercise (concentrate on your heart and mind). Most people can’t get the positive out until they get out the negative or their complaint about how they don’t want things to be.

2.) To make what you want more vivid and attractive to you, figure out the details of the specifics of what you want. How will it feel to you when you have these things? When you accomplish these goals? Once you have that how can you make them more powerful? One of the things I do with my clients is I ask them to breath live into their desires. They tell me how it feels in their body when they achieved their goals – like is their breathing fast or slow? Is there tension in their muscles or not. If so, where? I have them tell me what are the conversations they hear around them and what are they telling them selves when they go there? Increase mental vividness of what you want to do in order to increase its attractiveness to you.

3.) Try these behaviors and feelings on. Use your imagination to explore these feeling that you came up with in #2. Mentally rehearse them, so they feel natural. The more you practice the more your brain will search for those feeling and experiences making your desires into your reality. Many years ago I was handed a story about a girl who grew up in a family who made a refrigerator list. What ever the family wanted they put on this list and every week they made what they wanted more specific. And, like magic what they wanted would show up. In NLP what you are doing is aligning your deletion, distortion and generalization filters around what you want. Once they are aligned there is no reason for you wants to go unfulfilled.

This step-by-step practical program approach to change is the hallmark of NLP. NLP is a how-to technology for personal transformation. The differences between traditional clinical psychology and NLP, is that psychology is mostly concerned with describing issues, putting those issues in categories, and figuring out the history of the cause of those issues. NLP is interested in how our thoughts, actions, and feeling work together right now to produce our experience now.

To do NLP, we need completely new principles of how the brain works in comparison to what is known. It doesn’t have to be the truth but it has to work. And, it has to be completely new for us. When we try and learn something new, there is a strong temptation for us to make it into something we already know. To be successful with NLP we need to be wiling to be indefinitely wrong.

To effectively study the patterns of human excellence and build the structure of this model of how our brain works, we need to hold certain beliefs or hold that certain facts are true. In practice of NLP the generalizations we believe for practice are called “presuppositions.” The presuppositions of NLP are observations that Richard Bandler and John Grinder and others made with respect to creating NLP. Just by holding even a couple of these belief systems in your life, they have a transformative ability…we hold them not because they have been proven but because when they are held in mind, they give us a much greater degree of freedom of choice and opportunities.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

What is NLP? Definition#7

NLP is… A model of how we process info that comes information us from the world around us. NLP stands for Neuro-Linguistic Programming. It is rumoured that NLP got this name because Richard Bandler was stopped by a cop for some possible infraction and was asked what he was studying. The three books in his front seat were Neurobiology, Linguistics and Computer Programming. On the spot his brain came up with this name.

“Neuro” stands for the organs and pathways of the human nervous system. It is through the mental pathways of our five senses we create and process our experience: Visual Auditory, Kinaesthetic, Olfactory, Gustatory.

“Linguistic” indicates that neural systems processes are represented, ordered and sequenced into models an strategies through language and communications systems. It refers to our ability to use language and how specific words and phrases mirror our mental words. It also refers to the non-verbal communication systems of postures, gestures, and habits that reveal our thinking styles, beliefs and more. It is through these systems our neural representations are coded, ordered and given meaning. These include: pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, tastes, words.

“Programming” refers to the process of organizing components of a system (sensory representations in this case) to achieve specific outcomes. The word “programming” borrowed from computer science. It suggests that our thoughts, feelings and actions are simply habitual programs that can be changed by upgrading our software. This instruction set controls what content moves through which pathways, and in what order, to create our human experience. As humans, we use neuro-linguistic programs to create and maintain our experience. If we want a different experience of something, we have to load and use a different set of patterns (neuro-linguistic programs – that will create this desired experience.). How we code our experience is how we mentally represent our experience. Our personal programming consists of your internal processes and strategies (thinking patterns) that we use to make decisions, solve problems, learn, evaluate, and get results. NLP shows us how to reconcile our experiences and organize our internal programming so we can get the outcome we want.

Many philosophers and scientists have suggested that our worlds consist of our representations of reality. Up until the point of the development of NLP the only way to deal with this illusion of reality was to meditate for years until you are enlightened and you can dissolve the illusion. Which really doesn’t work for the rest of us. Richard Bandler thought ‘What is good dose it do to recognize the illusion if we can’t do anything about the illusion we don’t want?’ He noticed in a hypnosis class that could become selectively amnesiac, or change negative hallucination into positive ones or a person could anesthetize a part of their body. He also noticed that when someone did this, it resulted in changing their beliefs which, also changed their physiology too.

Bandler and Grinder were not only interested in how do people experience, but how people get better and how do they do it with excellence. Through all its varieties, the field of NLP is unique in having developed a set of perceptual frames and proven techniques for change. These can be used to understand, respect and transform how and who we are.. NLP provides a way to both quantitatively and qualitatively describe the nature of the unique reality of every individual. It makes the most useful, accurate and respectful means we have of addressing our true human and spiritual potential.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

What is NLP? Definition #6

NLP is… An operator’s manual for being human.

As with any significant technology there are several versions. NLP was the result of many people’s individual work and personal views combined together. 

The original founders of NLP were Richard Bandler and John Grinder. They organized the original information and built in their new insights. They started with the psychology work of Sigmond Freud and Pavlov’s Stimulus Response.

Richard and John then added to it the work of Fritz Perls (gestalt, perception, responsibility, choice, paradox, behavior, needs, values, congruence), Virgina Satir (Family systems, representational systems, matching, predicates, feedback) and Milton Erickson(reaching  the unconscious, metaphor, marking out the words, humor, puns, riddles, paradox). In the realm of Linguistics they took the work of Alfred Korsybski (Maps of Reality, we code our reality thus creating our reality, our coding has slip-page) and Noam Chomsky (Surface structure, deep structure, Impoverished and inadequate maps result from malfunctions in perceptions and thinking, presuppositions of thinking disclosed in language). They also used from computers and mathematics: chunking, ways of thinking and levels of abstraction. They looked and added in pieces that fit from Zen and other eastern religion philosophies, the work of Robert Assagioli, systems analysis,  theory, cybernetics and others.

 The original contributor and developer list includes: Judith DeLozier, Leslie Cameron-Bandler, Robert Dilts, David Gordon, Lynne Conwell, Michael LeBeau, Norma and Phil Barreta, Robert Hill, Genie Laborde, Jonathan Rice, Frank Pucelik, and Mary Myers.

It is no wonder that when you learn NLP that it is as different as the original developer that taught that person. 

And, it is that different. Some NLP was designed by some people who didn’t want to have feelings. There is some NLP that emphasizes language. There is NLP that was developed by people that thought people needed cookie cutter approaches for changing things. This is very procedural. In fact most of the NLP out there is of this language only, cookie-cutter variety.

NLP has changed a lot since it was first developed. The style of NLP I do has been altered dramatically from its original form. My personal mentor developed it for over 30 years from what he had learned from Lynn Conwell, Leslie Cameron-Bandler and Jonathan Rice(the first psychologist involved with NLP) before I learned it from them. I further developed what I learned and applied it for therapy use for trauma exposure which  I call “Therapeutic NLP.”

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

What is NLP? Definiton #3

NLP is… The art of modeling the form & sequence of internal states, internal computations & external behavior so that any known ability maybe replicated and taught (mostly).

A model is a set of instructions, procedures or steps that allows people to understand how a given talent or ability or can be performed. Models are different that theories. Theories deal with the “why” and not the “how” of experience.

Think about this way: The theory of flight gives you the reason why or why not successful flight will occur. A model airplane either flies or doesn’t fly. Because NLP is a model, it may not always work in theory, but it usually works in practice. And, a model is not the truth, but provides usable information about the truth.

Richard Bandler (one of the guys that created this NLP stuff) defines himself as the world’s best human modeler of unconscious behaviour. His career has been aimed at developing behavioural technologies to help people solve problems and achieve goals. And, I think at its essence, this is really what NLP is about – helping people be, do and have what they want.

In my own practice I’ve seen people change in front of me when they realize what the want is in their grasp. What many people don’t realize is that if they want something and someone else has it, it is available to them through this modeling technology. And, if the model that is currently being used in not working it can be changed or re-modeled into something that works better for that individual.

The reason why someone might opt for this technology instead of counseling, coaching or psychotherapy is that imbedded in the structure of the practice of NLP is teaching the client’s brain how to do the work so that they don’t need to be reminded to be different – In essence teaching them how to fish rather than just giving them a fish.

The process of modeling behavior whether applied to individuals, groups or organizations requires representations of the present state, desired state and resources. That is, the internal and external smells/tastes/picture/sounds & feelings that go along with the present state, desired state and resources. 

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com 

What is NLP? Definition #2

NLP is… A coding and notational system for understanding and patterning subjective reality. In order to produce a model of behaviours or anything else one must have certain tools to code information.

What Grinder and Bandler set out to do in creating NLP was to find a simple way of coding behaviour.

The purpose of a model is to identify patterns in the interactions between human behaviour and their environment. This is done so a specific behaviour can be systematized within the desired context to achieve the desired result. The model makes it easy for any one learning the model to obtain the desired results efficiently, effectively and consistently.

Decision theory shows a model in this structure: environmental variables (that we assume are limitations) plus decision variables (possibilities) create outcomes or results. Specifically, models are made up of a structural element or building blocks and a syntax or a set of rules that describe how the building blocks are put together. So if we are to change the outcomes, we need to change the inputs. The possibilities are what resources/inputs we think we have. However, if we can change some of those limitations into possibilities, we can change the final output.

NLP is a model designed to increase the possible outcomes of behaviour. In this way it allows us to change the inputs to increase flexibility so the final output or behaviour is changed. To make these changes we need a notation that describes experience (or how and what people perceive, think, feel and behave).

In NLP we use 5 classes of sensory experience: seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling, and tasting and we have both internal and external experiences of those. So it makes sense that we can use seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling& tasting as our coding system. We can also note if the experience is and internally generated experience or an externally generated experience. By being able to track those expressions of experience, we can change a single aspect, which will provide for a flexibility in perception and result in a completely different output. 

For example, if you picture smelly garbage and we remove the colour out of that garbage, is it smelly? Or if we move the picture of tomorrow’s deadline test further away from you, is the pressure as intense? Most like not. This is the beauty of the model of NLP as a coding system. We can take any experience and break it up into smaller manageable pieces then change an element/piece and produce change.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com 

What is NLP? Definition #1

Even though I already have a listing about what NLP and I probably defined a million times for people I still find that I am always asked what exactly is NLP? it seems to me that people even other people that are NLP practitioners do not have a clear understanding of NLP. I was wondering why this was until I started researching it and found that every practitioner that was published had a different working definition. So what I thought I would do here is explain each definition in the hopes that you really understand what NLP is and what is possible.

NLP definition#1: NLP is the study of the structure of human experience. What this implicates is that your personal experience has a structure to it. It also implies that the people that created NLP have some how categorized experience into manageable parts or models. If your experience sucks (technical term), NLP can help change that sucking experience.

So if you don’t have the money, the girl/guy, the relationship, friendship, the work, the career, the body etc. NLP can help change that. Because your life as you experience it has a structure, by knowing the structure, it can be altered. NLP can alter your perception so that you see the opportunities that seem to not be there, to figure out how to be that person that will attract that girl/guy and have your life moving forward.

If there is a person on earth that has what you want, NLP can teach you how to model that experience. Richard Bandler to this day talks about creating NLP as the art of modeling human excellence. 

It is because if the idea that there is a structure(something stagnant) to an experience that allows us the ability to make change. The structure shows up when you look at the repeating cycle of behaviors and results. You can see a cycle of pain that happens in situations across all spectrums. A person will experience the same pain in their childhood,adulthood,at work,relationships,in friendships with family until it is resolved.

The structure is the pattern. But we because of the way our brain’s work we don’t see the entire pattern. Many times most of the pattern is hidden to us. We only know that it feels bad over and over again. And, we may not know why. In TNLP(Therapeutic NLP) we use a bit of hypnotic languaging to relax a person to allow for access to this information.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Do you know how to control the pictures in your mind?

So if you have any doubts about the pictures in your mind try really hard now to not think of white bears. You can’t help but see them… and your picture of white bears is very different than everyone else’s pictures of white bears… feel free to ask them to describe their pictures…

Richard Bandler and John Grinder (our NLP godfathers) discovered this. They discovered that these pictures are part of our individual maps of reality. They also noticed that we hold these pictures in space…so right now, close your eyes and put your hands out and try and grab that picture of the white bear you just created.

Where is your picture located? Most likely it will be located on the right side and above the horizon. That’s because your brain creates new images on the right and it makes pictures above the horizon.

If you feel anxious the picture is too close to you. So for an example use a picture of stinky garbage. If you move that picture up to your nose, you get anxious (and your nose will probably crinkle!)… try a picture of something you have to do, like an exam or a term paper, or a work assignment or even planning an event. Putting the picture of it up to your nose will make you more concerned and anxious about accomplishing the task. But, if you move the picture back a little farther than where the picture originated, you won’t feel as anxious.

Back to the smelly garbage. The smelly garbage on your nose will make nose crinkle. What your brain is doing, is smelling the garbage, even though the garbage is not really there…if you drain the color out of that garbage picture, your nose will stop crinkling and your brain will stop smelling the garbage that’s not there… you can use this with painful thoughts too.

Find the picture that you are making with the painful thought for example the person you dread having a conversation with and drain the color out of it.
Let me know how this works for you…

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com