Tag Archive for learning

Presupposition#12: Every behavior is useful in some context

To obtain healing, growth and success we don’t have to get rid of our so-called “bad” behaviours. Rather, acquiring more behavioral choices that provide more options for more useful responses in all areas of our lives.

If a behavior does not work, it is useful to re-contextualize it than to fight against it, resist it, or make it wrong.

As children we learned one way of doing everything. The supposed “right” way to survive. As we grow the information we have may not make sense for the situations we experience. This may be due to the fact that when we were taught the information we were taught we were children and didn’t have the experience to what we were learning. The information we learned became patterns in our lives and were useful until they weren’t. Which is when they become emotionally painful. That’s when we need to update our system. The most effective tool in updating and adding to this patterning is NLP.

The best way to have your brain choose a new option is to make the new option more positive than the intended positive out come currently available to your brain. But in order to offer a choice, some versions of NLP say to eliminate those painful memories entirely because they don’t hold useful information. This is how Therapeutic NLP is different from traditional or formulaic NLP. I believe all information we have is useful and needed. If I don’t include it, acknowledge it, and make it ok, you as my client can’t make any changes in your system because I can’t be in full rapport with you.

And, I know that if I offer the brain a better option, rather than subtract, it will use that option more often and over time the painful connections will fall away. 

If you look at the neural connections of a child’s brain through development, you’ll see an increase, then a decrease of connections over time. This is what happens in learning. Your brain creates many connections in learning something new. But as those skills become embedded and practiced the unneeded extra connections used in learning the skill fall away. This way your brain still knows how to crawl. You just don’t need all the information you needed to learn how to crawl. This is the efficiency of your brain’s processing and learning.

Tracy Joy, Founder of NLP VancouverTracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Are you a bad speller? Want to know why and how to fix?

If you were like me, the teachers that were teaching me to spell told me to sound out the words. This is actually the wrong sense to use to start your spelling strategy.

Great spellers, read the information off their brain, so spelling is a visual act not a auditory act… At least in the beginning… Learning to spell is similar to learning to read. You need to know what shapes correspond to making the sounds of the word or words you are learning. To do this simply cut up the word into pieces but not along phonetic or syllable lines.

For example:  The word “octopus” could be broken up like this: oct-o-pus

I’m asking you to cut the word up so the breaks don’t make sense like so: o-ct-op-us

The reason I’m asking you to cut it up in such a way is that now when you look at the word you can focus more on the shapes of the letters, whereas before you are concentrating on a pattern your brain already knows or is familiar with.

So to create a spelling strategy in your brain:

  1. look at the letters and then look toward the ceiling to your left and imagine the shapes of the letters.
  2. then look toward you left ear and say the word,
  3. then look down to the left and slap you thigh.

You’ve done one round, of visualizing, creating a sound, and then a feeling. Now repeat it 5-6 more times. If you do this exercise for about 5 words your brain should start getting the hang of the pattern and start accessing spelling words this way… and you will be well on your way to becoming a better speller.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Have you or your child been diagnosed with ADD or ADHD?

I had trouble in school. It wasn’t that I wasn’t bright because I seemed to tutor people that got A’s. But, I couldn’t seem to get the grades no matter how hard I tried or what type of studying I did. I was diagnosed after university with ADD.

And, I was satisfied with that diagnosis until I learned NLP from Carl Buchheit in California. I was the class example of a “bad speller”… but Carl said I wasn’t a bad speller I just had a “bad auditory memory.”

When we unpacked the memory (This is something I frequently do with my clients: I unpack an old memory that is unconsciously triggers a response that keeps a person  from getting what they want in life.) we found that when ever I was stressed, in an exam or test situation, I heard my mother voice say I was stupid and then I would feel bad and not be able to go back to spelling the word or answering the question on a test.

Many times bad feelings take us off course… they get in the way of what we want and what we can and want to accomplish in our lives. NLP uses many different techniques to change the perspectives that created current results (those bad feelings) so that those memories and thoughts work better for us and allow us to achieve what we want in life.

 

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com