Tag Archive for auditory

What is NLP? Definition#7

NLP is… A model of how we process info that comes information us from the world around us. NLP stands for Neuro-Linguistic Programming. It is rumoured that NLP got this name because Richard Bandler was stopped by a cop for some possible infraction and was asked what he was studying. The three books in his front seat were Neurobiology, Linguistics and Computer Programming. On the spot his brain came up with this name.

“Neuro” stands for the organs and pathways of the human nervous system. It is through the mental pathways of our five senses we create and process our experience: Visual Auditory, Kinaesthetic, Olfactory, Gustatory.

“Linguistic” indicates that neural systems processes are represented, ordered and sequenced into models an strategies through language and communications systems. It refers to our ability to use language and how specific words and phrases mirror our mental words. It also refers to the non-verbal communication systems of postures, gestures, and habits that reveal our thinking styles, beliefs and more. It is through these systems our neural representations are coded, ordered and given meaning. These include: pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, tastes, words.

“Programming” refers to the process of organizing components of a system (sensory representations in this case) to achieve specific outcomes. The word “programming” borrowed from computer science. It suggests that our thoughts, feelings and actions are simply habitual programs that can be changed by upgrading our software. This instruction set controls what content moves through which pathways, and in what order, to create our human experience. As humans, we use neuro-linguistic programs to create and maintain our experience. If we want a different experience of something, we have to load and use a different set of patterns (neuro-linguistic programs – that will create this desired experience.). How we code our experience is how we mentally represent our experience. Our personal programming consists of your internal processes and strategies (thinking patterns) that we use to make decisions, solve problems, learn, evaluate, and get results. NLP shows us how to reconcile our experiences and organize our internal programming so we can get the outcome we want.

Many philosophers and scientists have suggested that our worlds consist of our representations of reality. Up until the point of the development of NLP the only way to deal with this illusion of reality was to meditate for years until you are enlightened and you can dissolve the illusion. Which really doesn’t work for the rest of us. Richard Bandler thought ‘What is good dose it do to recognize the illusion if we can’t do anything about the illusion we don’t want?’ He noticed in a hypnosis class that could become selectively amnesiac, or change negative hallucination into positive ones or a person could anesthetize a part of their body. He also noticed that when someone did this, it resulted in changing their beliefs which, also changed their physiology too.

Bandler and Grinder were not only interested in how do people experience, but how people get better and how do they do it with excellence. Through all its varieties, the field of NLP is unique in having developed a set of perceptual frames and proven techniques for change. These can be used to understand, respect and transform how and who we are.. NLP provides a way to both quantitatively and qualitatively describe the nature of the unique reality of every individual. It makes the most useful, accurate and respectful means we have of addressing our true human and spiritual potential.

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Part 2: Do you know your strongest sense? How do you use this information in sales?

When you are in sales, you are playing the numbers game. Everyone you meet could be a potential customer or know a potential customer. Based on your speech patterns, the more someone feels comfortable with you the more someone will want to tell others about you and your conversations or will want to buy from you.

To do that, you want to mirror them as much as much as possible. If you are mirroring someone, you want to mirror their gestures back to them, their body posture, their breathing and the exact words they use (i.e.: the word “success” is not the same as the word “successful”.). One of the things you can do is listen for in their words and actions in their preferred sense.

Their preferred sense shows up in the predicates they use… so words like: see, view, and look are visual predicates. Words like: tactile, texture, emote, are feeling predicates and words like:  sound, music, hear, advise, are auditory predicates…etc…

In your conversations with others they move their eyes as well as their face to process information. Unless they have a brain injury, the person is lying, or they were taught to never lose eye contact with a person while talking, a person that is primarily visual will look up, above the horizon maybe to the right or to the left many times through your conversation… but mostly their eye positioning when accessing information while speaking to you will look up towards the ceiling. When someone is looking at you over their glasses they are looking at the visual spectrum and trying to avoid receiving feelings from you.

If a person is primarily auditory, they will look side to side. I have friend who turns his whole head from side to side just to maintain eye contact with the person he’s talking to. An auditory person mainly looks shifty eyed. Their gaze when accessing information is along the horizon or their ear line and a little bit lower (like 15% grade)

A feeling dominant person will mostly gaze down well below the horizon or where their ears are. Their posture will follow their eyes. They could also look directly at you and shake their knee or fidget with their hands… that’s also a feeling person processing a feeling.

If a person is smell oriented you will see their nose scrunch and twist as they process information.

If a person is taste oriented you will see their mouth chew.

These are in addition to anything they might say.

The big issue is one orientation doesn’t hear the other orientation. You need to speak to them in their preferred sense (using predicates from their preferred sense or with no specific sense indicated by your predicates.) for your information to make sense to their brain… otherwise use predicates that don’t promote a preference… example: tell me about your “experience” rather than tell me what you “see“…

Any other questions related to this topic?

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Have you or your child been diagnosed with ADD or ADHD?

I had trouble in school. It wasn’t that I wasn’t bright because I seemed to tutor people that got A’s. But, I couldn’t seem to get the grades no matter how hard I tried or what type of studying I did. I was diagnosed after university with ADD.

And, I was satisfied with that diagnosis until I learned NLP from Carl Buchheit in California. I was the class example of a “bad speller”… but Carl said I wasn’t a bad speller I just had a “bad auditory memory.”

When we unpacked the memory (This is something I frequently do with my clients: I unpack an old memory that is unconsciously triggers a response that keeps a person  from getting what they want in life.) we found that when ever I was stressed, in an exam or test situation, I heard my mother voice say I was stupid and then I would feel bad and not be able to go back to spelling the word or answering the question on a test.

Many times bad feelings take us off course… they get in the way of what we want and what we can and want to accomplish in our lives. NLP uses many different techniques to change the perspectives that created current results (those bad feelings) so that those memories and thoughts work better for us and allow us to achieve what we want in life.

 

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com

Have you ever had a brain injury? If so, do you have issues with your memory or learning etc?

I’ve had a number of clients that have come to me with a brain injury. They were deemed fit by their doctors, but when I asked them to do certain things for me in a session they weren’t able to do it because of the headache they had from what I asked them to do.

One person claimed he was terrible speller and seemed like he was a visual learner when speaking to him but and auditory learner when he was in front of me.

Another person had issues with scheduling anything beyond 24 hours and wasn’t learning from his previous mistakes. He also, said that although he himself was a NLP practitioner, none of the NLP he did ever worked on him. Again when I asked him to do certain things for me in a session he weren’t able to do it because of the headache he had from what I asked him to do.

So here’s the exercise: while keeping your head perfectly straight move your eyes in a circular pattern from looking at the ceiling to looking to your right, then down at the floor, then to your left and then to the ceiling again. Repeat this exercise in the other direction. If there is a space where your eyes go that has you get a headache, keep pushing your eyes in that direction until you don’t get a headache any more.

If you don’t work this area, you can loose access to very important and useful areas of your brain and not realize it.  If you don’t have any pain, you’re fine and the exercise was worth the exploration.

 

Tracy Joy is an NLP practitioner, author, and speaker in Vancouver, Canada. She is an international business expert in the area of human systems analysis and thinking change. If you have brain questions, send them Tracy and she’ll answer them on this blog. She can be reached through www.TherapeuticNLP.com